We all want to be a successful insurance agent. However, not everyone is practicing the proper daily habits to accomplish their goals.

One of the obvious ones is a good work ethic. You obviously have to put in the time to prospect, call the prospects, closing deals, and maintaining the relationships.

Let’s look at the not-so-obvious daily habits you should practice:

A successful insurance agent learns from a mentor

Having a mentor who is where you want to be has proven time and time again to be a good tactic. A successful mentor provides a road map to the destination you wish to reach. They can teach you how to overcome difficult objections, how to properly build your agency, and anything you need to know to reach your idea of a successful insurance agent.

Pay attention to digital communication

You want to stay top-of-mind and reach your customers wherever they interact with brands. The most successful brands now are the ones who were able to reach customers on social media first and effectively. So, don’t dismiss the newest apps or social media. Don’t be afraid to take risks because it can pay off in a big way. A decade ago, salespeople would’ve thought it tacky to text prospects. Now, it’s an effective sales tactic.

Train daily

So many insurance agents are missing out on sales because they are jumping into their day without warming up first. If you work out, you don’t start putting up heavy weight right away. You stretch or put up light weight to warm your muscles up first. You should warm up before trying to sell policies too. Role play with other people in your office, listen to your calls and see how you can improve, listen to audio books, or whatever you can do to get ready. Don’t miss out on sales by bumbling your first appointment or call. Practice every day and watch your skill improve as well as your close percentage on the first call or appointment of the day.

Achieving your income goals is much easier with blueprints of success. Cody Askins, a successful insurance agent himself, provides accountability, direction, and training to agents in his Success Society program.